The Rockin' Eddy Oldies Radio Show

Live From Rockin' Eddy's Drive In!
Album Cover - Brenda Lee - Miss Dynomite Album Cover - Chuck Berry - The Great Twenty Eight Album Cover - The Coasters
Album Cover - The Chirping Crickets Album Cover - Duane Eddy - Have Twangy Guitar Will Travel Album Cover - Elvis Presly
Album Cover - Beach Boys -Surfin Safari Album Cover - Twist with Chubby Checker Album Cover - Dion - Runarround Jue
Rockin Eddy's 50s Drive-in Diner with 1950s cars in front.
Album Cover - The Fats Domino Jukebox Album Cover - The Isley Brothers - Shout! Album Cover - Marty Robbins - Gunfighter Ballads
Album Cover - The Olympics - Duin The Hully Gully Album Cover - Ritchie Valens Album Cover - Roy Orbison - Lonely and Blue
Album Cover - The Drifters - Rockin and Driftin Album Cover - The Shirelles - Baby It's You Album Cover - Dance 'til Quater to Three with U.S. Bonds

"I started listening to Rockin' Eddy last March and never left the station after that.  What really makes this station special is the quality and quantity of old songs played: all the classics and many other songs we haven't heard in years on the radio, with the vast majority being from the Pre-Beatles era.  I would strongly recommend this station to anyone who likes and / or remembers the early days of rock and roll; you won't be disappointed."

In Memory of Tony Desgro - Patchogue, New York on Long Island (1949-2017)

"If you're looking for early Rock-and-Roll, DooWop, R&B, Soul, Motown, Country-Crossover, Rockabilly, and/or Folk, don't even think about sources like Pandora.  I tried and consistently got about 5 tunes from the genre followed by anything they could find from the time period.  AOL Radio used to allow you to pick a genre or artist and they'd play about 40 tunes that "sounded similar".  Now that they've been bought by Slacker, you get random tunes from the era over and over again.  Unlike other Internet radio stations, and Podcasts, Rockin' Eddy plays thousands of hits and misses from all the above genres.  Eddy plays songs and instrumentals I've completely forgotten, or may have never heard at all back in the day, because they may have just not gotten the air time but should have.  The weekly live "Live Shows" provide great historical, and educational, background on where and how some of our favorites came about.   Most of all however, this show makes you feel like you're cruising in your '57 Chevy with the AM radio tuned to your favorite local station (without the static)."

Bob Frohreich - Lake Tillery, North Carolina

"Rockin' Eddy gets it, that those of us who were there at the birth of Rock and Roll have a soft spot for the plethora of records that came from that era. Most knew what was on the Top 40 stations, but there is a vast library of other songs that didn't get much airplay, but are nonetheless treasures - and Eddy has them so they can continue to see the "light of day." I listen via Bluetooth at home in the morning getting ready for work (yup, I haven't folded the tent yet), have the station tuned in on my PC at work so I hear the music in the background, and through my home PC in my home office via Sonos. If he didn't have such a great variety, if the playlist was just a loop, and if he didn't have the passion that I can tell he does, it would have been "one and done." But that isn't the case, this is one terrific Internet radio station if you grew up in the '50's, have an affection for the early years of rock and roll, and want to dig deep into a lot of artists and songs that may be heard for the first time. Thanks, Eddy!!"

Mick Piper - Portland Oregon


"I cranked up my new internet radio a few days ago and came across Rockin' Eddy. What a great format! Last night he played a Barbara Pittman song. I never thought I'd hear her on the radio since I first heard her on WKBW in Buffalo, N.Y. in the late 50's (George "Hound Dog" Lorenz was the DJ). At that time her song "I'm Getting Better All the Time" was being played. There are lots of oldies stations, but none like his. I love the fact that he includes many of the "near misses" as well as the major hits. Eddy, keep doing what you are doing. My rig is locked in to your wavelength. Thank you."

Dr. David Small - Pearland, Texas
Studio Microphone with Headphones CELEBRATING THE GOLDEN ERA OF AMERICAN ROCK & ROLL!
THE WORLD BEFORE THE BEATLES!
Animated Turntable
Album Cover - Brenda Lee - Miss Dynomite Album Cover - Chuck Berry - The Great Twenty Eight Album Cover - The Coasters Album Cover - The Fats Domino Jukebox Album Cover - The Isley Brothers - Shout! Album Cover - Marty Robbins - Gunfighter Ballads
Album Cover - The Chirping Crickets Album Cover - Duane Eddy - Have Twangy Guitar Will Travel Album Cover - Elvis Presly Album Cover - The Olympics - Duin The Hully Gully Album Cover - Ritchie Valens Album Cover - Roy Orbison - Lonely and Blue
Album Cover - Beach Boys -Surfin Safari Album Cover - Twist with Chubby Checker Album Cover - Dion - Runarround Jue Album Cover - The Drifters - Rockin and Driftin Album Cover - The Shirelles - Baby It's You Album Cover - Dance 'til Quater to Three with U.S. Bonds

Welcome to the Rockin' Eddy Oldies Radio Show, bringing you the widest selection of oldies anywhere on our planet Earth.  We play the very first golden age of American Rock n' Roll, the vast majority of songs predating the Beatles.  On the show, you'll hear all the charted hits from and beyond the Top 40.  All the hits & misses from the genres of Soul, Motown, Country, Doo-Wop, Folk and Rock & Roll.  And why did you like Top 40 radio back in the '50s and '60s?  Was it because they played non-stop music commercial free?  No!  Come on, it was because of the jingles, remember?  Now on the show, we've turned back the hands of time and set the show as it should be with classic jingles and a radio personality from when radio was king, and not television.  So join me, Rockin' Eddy, 24/7, anywhere you are in the world, to discover or re-discover an extraordinary generation of music and I will take you back to the world gone away.  Rockin' Eddy thanking you for listening.
59 Chevy - Front59 Chevy - Rear
Who is Rockin' Eddy?

Why, I'm your DJ. And that's all you're going to get out of me; I like to keep out of the limelight and I'd much rather live a a low-profile life.

What is the purpose of what you're doing?

Nothing really. I'm doing it for fun. I don't want any compensation for what I'm doing and surely, I don't want any fame. I simply love oldies, love the Rock & Roll Era and I have a giant fondness of this period in American history. I really wish we could turn back the hands of time to relive a generation that will sadly never occur again.

If you really want a clear answer, I'd like to show everyone that musically, socially and culturally it wasn't a generation as backward and dull as most people believe it was. It was indeed very ahead of its time. Public opinion has claimed for years that this period was 'too conservative" or based upon a "narrow-minded" outlook on life. Well, in the Fifties and the Sixties advertising for both tobacco and alcohol was commonplace whereas today it is completely forbidden on the radio. Songs like "Ahab The Arab" by Ray Stevens or "Don't Go Near The Indians" by Rex Allen remind us that political correctness never took hold of people's lives; after all, these songs are just part of our entertainment. And most importantly, precisely because of this musical generation, the racial divide in America was diminishing and coming to a close. At the end of the day, people really didn't care what the singer looked like, what his/her race was or ethnicity.

Moreover, someone has to keep this music alive, otherwise it will be forgotten; I like to think of my playlist as a museum of Americana. With copyright laws in place for a long time and royalty issues, it will be harder to keep this music alive for generations to come, and the very artists we celebrate on the station, many of them long gone, would truly love to see their works of art being enjoyed by average people like you and I.

What is so special about your oldies radio show?

While many oldies stations and/or DJs for years have tried to convince us that oldies are predominantly songs which went from 1964 to 1973, I'm playing the genuine era of oldies that went from the early Fifties to about somewhere in the mid-Sixties. So many people out there are misusing the term and therefore misguiding their audience.

The decade predating the Beatles has been so overlooked that it's true most people feel more "comfortable" with the greatest hits of the '60s & "70s exclusively and excluding any '50s record that wouldn't "fit" with what they're playing and remarkably but sadly they've made this concept of "oldies" a reality for mainstream listenership. Honestly the music encompassing these decades is fabulous, but it has already achieved the attention it deserves.

Part of the problem itself lies in the fact that even baby boomers nowadays or even back then merely knew "Rock Around The Clock" and "Great Balls Of Fire" or are familiar with some Elvis tune. And then there are analysts in these demographics or beyond who have literally argued that the Beatles were needed by 1964 to change the music landscape. Why would they want them to change it when the Beatles themselves emulated groups and sounds from this era we celebrate on the show?

Indeed a line was drawn when they arrived on American soil in February of 1964; Doo-wop was dying out, those exciting instrumentals were fading away, Rock & Roll became just "Rock" and Rhythm & Blues was turning into a genre called Soul.

So yes, my show is special because I've pushed aside songs we've heard over and over again for years like "I'm A Believer" - "California Dreamin'" - "Unchained Melody" (the Righteous Brothers' version). Frankly, we're all tired of listening to these songs. Instead, I've started to play other notable oldies like "Tra La La Suzy" by Dean & Jean or "Miss Fine" by the New Yorkers. Furthermore, I'm not just limiting the playlist to the hits of the era like most stations; I'm adding misses as well, rarities, both A-sides & B-sides and uncharted songs, which perhaps found little airplay including back then.

Do you play all original songs?

Yes, I do. There are so many stations out there that play alternate takes of songs (because they don't know they're playing them), some which are fine, but the originals are being left out totally.

Additionally, I'm playing original songs before they became international successes with other artists. For example, you can hear on my station "Got My Mind Set On You" not by George Harrison of course, but by James Ray (1962), "Someday We'll Be Together" not by the Supremes, but by Johnny & Jackey (1961) and "The Hippy Hippy Shake" not by the Swingin' Blue Jeans but by Chan Romero (1958).

How long have you been in radio?

Don't ask! Let's just say that I've seen demographics and corporate radio destroy my favorite means of communication. I remember when radio used to be fun!

Who inspired you to go into radio?

When I was five, I listened to Dick Biondi and the records he played. Later I discovered Wolfman Jack and I was here to stay.